CT/CT Angiography
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CT/CT Angiography

CT (computed tomography), also known as a CAT scan, is a specialized imaging test to visualize different body tissues and organs in detail. CT imaging is particularly useful because it can show several types of tissue — lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels — with great clarity. Using specialized equipment and expertise to create and interpret CT scans, radiologists can more easily diagnose problems such as cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, trauma and musculoskeletal disorders.

Diagnostic Centers of America was one of the first diagnostic imaging centers in the United States to offer this state-of-the-art technology to perform coronary CT angiography (CTA) and coronary calcium scores. Coronary CTA, or CT angiography, is a relatively new, noninvasive imaging test that combines X-rays and computer technology to detect heart disease and other vascular conditions. Coronary CT angiography is an excellent diagnostic tool.

How Should You Prepare for CT or CTA?

You may be asked to change into a gown. If your exam requires contrast, a skilled healthcare provider will start a temporary IV as well as attach cardiac monitoring leads to your chest.

For specific CT exam preparation instruction, click on your exam to find out more.

 

ACR guidelines for diabetic/renal compromised patients having CT with IV contrast

The ACR recommends that patients taking Metformin be classified into one of two categories based on the patient’s renal function (as measured by GFR).

  • Based on the ACR recommendations, patients who are taking Metformin and are not renal compromised, i.e., with normal creatinine level, can safely take their Metformin without any restriction before or after the contrast injection.
  • In patients taking Metformin who are known to have acute kidney injury or severe chronic kidney disease (stage IV or stage V), the contrast will not be administered unless the patient is scheduled for dialysis the next day or within 24 hours. In that case, the Metformin should be temporarily discontinued at the time of the procedure and be withheld for 48 hours subsequent to the procedure and reinstituted thereafter.

Bloodwork requirements for CT with IV contrast

  • Creatinine labs are needed for all patients regardless of age who are diabetic within two weeks of exam, and for patients greater than 65 years old within six weeks of exam.

CT scan of the heart with IV contrast

  • No stimulants, decongestants, caffeine or erectile dysfunction medication 48 hours prior to exam. No allergies to iodinated contrast. Beta blocker may be required. Okay to drink water until one hour prior to exam. *DIABETIC/RENAL COMPROMISED PATIENTS having a CT exam with IV contrast, see ACR guidelines above. Take all nondiabetic medications as directed.

CT scan of the head/neck/chest with contrast

  • Nothing to eat or drink four hours prior to exam. *DIABETIC/RENAL COMPROMISED PATIENTS having a CT exam with IV contrast, see instructions above. Take all nondiabetic medications as directed.

CT scan of the abdomen & abdomen/pelvis with or without contrast

  • Nothing to eat or drink 4 hours prior to exam. Two hours prior to exam, drink first bottle of liquid. Thirty minutes prior to exam, drink 1/2 of second bottle. Bring remaining 1/2 bottle to exam. *DIABETIC/RENAL COMPROMISED PATIENTS having a CT exam with IV contrast, see ACR guidelines above. Take all nondiabetic medications as directed.

CT scan of the pelvis with or without contrast

  • Nothing to eat or drink four hours prior to exam. Two hours prior to exam, drink first bottle of liquid. Thirty minutes prior to exam, drink second bottle of liquid. *DIABETIC/RENAL COMPROMISED PATIENTS having a CT exam with IV contrast, see ACR guidelines above. Take all nondiabetic medications as directed.

What to Expect During CT or CTA

You will lie on a scan table that slides slowly into a large CT scanner. The CT staff will take preliminary scans to help define the area to be imaged. During this time, you will be asked to hold your breath and lie still. Once the area is defined, you will receive an injection of contrast media through the IV to “highlight” the vascular structures. As the contrast is injected, you may feel a warm flushing sensation or have a metallic taste in your mouth. This is a normal and will pass quickly.

It is important that you remain very still during the procedure. You may be asked to wait a short time while the images are reviewed to determine if additional images are needed.

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EIGHT CONVENIENT LOCATIONS IN PALM BEACH COUNTY


3601 PGA Blvd., Suite 100

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 Phone: Map & Directions

1572 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard
Suite 2

West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Phone: 561.496.6935 Map & Directions

2565 South State Road 7

Wellington, FL 33414 Phone: 561.496.6935 Map & Directions

1425 Gateway Boulevard
Suite 100

Boynton Beach, FL 33426 Phone: 561.496.6935 Map & Directions
El Clair Medical Center
6080 W Boynton Beach Boulevard
Suite 140

Boynton Beach, FL 33437 Phone: 561.496.6935 Map & Directions
Village Center
15340 Jog Road
Suite 160

Delray Beach, FL 33446 Phone: 561.496.6935 Map & Directions

8142 Glades Road

Boca Raton, FL 33434 Phone: 561.496.6935 Map & Directions

23071 State Road 7

Boca Raton, FL 33428 Phone: Map & Directions

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